Marker-assisted sampling of the cultivated Andean potato Solanum phureja collection using RAPD markers uri icon

abstract

  • The potato crop originated in the Andean highlands where numerous farmer's varieties and non-cultivated wild species exist. An Andean potato collection is held in trust at the International Potato Center (CIP) to preserve the biodiversity of this crop and ensure the supply of germplasm for potato improvement worldwide. A core collection representing the biodiversity of the Andean potato germplasm is under construction using morphological, molecular, and geographic data. One of the eight cultivated potato species, Solanum phureja, has been genotyped using the RAPD technique. A protocol suitable for large germplasm collection genotyping has been developed to process numerous samples at reasonable costs. From 106 RAPD primers evaluated, we have selected 12 primers yielding 102 polymorphic markers, which unambiguously discriminated all 128 accessions but 2 that are possible duplicates. The S. phureja germplasm collected throughout the Andean countries appears to have a homogeneous genetic constitution. There was no clear geographic pattern as indicated by cluster analysis of the RAPD data. A sub-group of 20 accessions has been identified on the basis of the marker data and selected to maximize molecular (RAPD) variance and polymorphism. The probability of capturing equal amounts of marker polymorphism in this sub-group of 20 accessions by random sampling is less than 40%. This set accessions represents our first group of accessions that may constitute a core of the S. phureja collection. This tentative core will be challenged for diversity content by alternate markers and agronomic traits. Hence, the methodology for sampling less than 10% of the base collection, proposed for core collections by Brown (1989), can be based on molecular marker data provided cost-efficient fingerprints are developed.

publication date

  • 1999
  • 1999