RAPD variation in sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam) cultivars from South America and Papua New Guinea uri icon

abstract

  • The island of New Guinea is considered a secondary center on diversity for sweetpotato, because of its range of isolated ecological niches and large number of cultivars found within a small area. Information of genetic diversity in Papua New Guinea (PNG) sweetpotato is essential for rationalizing the global sweetpotato germplasm collection. Using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), we compared the genetic variation and genetic diversity in 18 PNG cultivars versus 18 cultivars from South America. The analysis of molecular variance revealed large genetic diversity in both groups of cultivars. The within-group (among individuals) variation accounted for 90.6% of the total molecular variance. However, the difference between PNG and South American groups is statistically significant, although it explained only 9.4% of the total molecular variance. The PNG cultivars are also less divergent than their South American ancestors as the mean genetic distance in PNG group is significantly smaller than that of South American group. The lower level of genetic diversity in PNG cultivars was also reflected by multidimensional scaling. This study shows that PNG cultivars, after many years of isolated evolution in an unique agro-ecological environment are substantially divergent from their ancestors in South America. The genetic diversity level in PNG cultivars is significantly lower than that in South American cultivars. It thus provides a baseline for continuing studies of genetic diversity in different sweetpotato gene pools.

publication date

  • 1998
  • 1998