Soil Compaction Induced Changes in Morpho-physiological Characteristics of Common Bean uri icon

abstract

  • The progress in identification of genotypes with roots showing greater ability to penetrate compacted soils under moisture stress and understanding the physiological basis and morphological expression of the characteristics associated is fundamental to improving crop's tolerance to drought and to increase productivity under individual and combined stress conditions. Our objectives were to: (i) determine genotypic differences in root penetration ability of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) using two methods (compacted soil layers and wax-petrolatum layers) to simulate soil compaction; and (ii) identify the morpho-physiological characteristics associated with the ability to penetrate compacted layers under well-watered and intermittent drought conditions in a greenhouse environment. Six common bean genotypes of different origin (Andean, Mesoamerican and interspecific) were tested in two trials. In the first trial, we evaluated genotypic differences in morpho-physiological characteristics that were associated with the root's ability to penetrate compacted soil layers of 1.2, 1.4, and 1.6 g cm(-3 )bulk densities. In the second trial, we used another method to determine genotypic differences in root's ability to penetrate wax-petrolatum layers of low, medium, and high mechanical impedance. The conditions for root growth were severely restricted by compaction and aggravated by drought stress. The medium level of mechanical impedance of wax petrolatum layer method showed the best results to evaluate bean genotypes for soil compaction tolerance. Among the six genotypes tested, ALB 91 (an interspecific line) was identified as the one with the greatest root penetration ability compared with A774 which showed the lowest root penetration ability under both well-watered and drought conditions.

publication date

  • 2019
  • 2019