From the Executive Board to the Classroom. What Debt Relief Means for Education in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) uri icon

abstract

  • This analysis re-assesses the IMF's decision to grant debt relief to the DRC in 2010 based on the country's poverty reduction and growth performance: would the IMF come to the same conclusion given the current knowledge available about the impact of the debt relief process on public governance and service delivery? First, it shows that, whereas the direct resource effect of this aid modality was minimal, the indirect effect was more significant: the conditionalities attached to the process helped to stabilize the economy and increased the overall budget of the Congolese state. This increased resource availability also sustainably percolated to the education sector. Second, however, the impact on social development was minimal: school enrolment increased but was hardly accompanied by extra budget per pupil, whereas more complicated challenges like disparities in access or quality of schooling were left untouched. The government's strategy was also partly short-circuited by the electoral process.

publication date

  • 2019
  • 2019