Herbaceous plants in the understory of a pitch canker-affected Pinus radiata plantation are endophytically infected with Fusarium circinatum uri icon

abstract

  • Fusarium circinatum was recently detected as an endophyte in grasses causing no apparent damage. Our goal was to describe the endophytic colonization of herbaceous host plants growing in a plantation of Pinus radiata with symptoms of pitch canker disease, which may act as a reservoir of inoculum. We detected the fungus in five species of dicot families (Asteraceae, Lamiaceae, Rosaceae), in addition to two species in the Poaceae. The fungus was found in the aerial part of non-symptomatic hosts, so we describe E circinatum as an endophyte that is mainly transmitted by spores through the air. It was also detected in Hypochaeris radicata seeds, suggesting the potential occurrence of vertical transmission. An analysis of microsatellite markers showed a unique haplotype regardless of whether the isolates' origin was pine cankers or non-symptomatic herbaceous plants. Thus, the same genotype can adopt a pathogenic or endophytic lifestyle. We conclude that non -symptomatic plants can act as reservoirs of inoculum: pine seedlings can be infeded from senescent tissue of non-symptomatic hosts colonized by the fungus. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd and British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

publication date

  • 2018
  • 2018