Application of DRIFT-FTIR spectroscopy for quantitative prediction of simple sugars in two local and two Floridian mango ( Mangifera indica L.) cultivars in Kenya uri icon

abstract

  • Background: Mangoes are fruits of nutritional importance in Kenya. The fruits vary in their sugars depending on cultivar type and ripening stage. Current methods of sugar content analysis are based on HPLC methods, which are accurate but expensive and time-consuming. We evaluated the potential of diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy as a rapid tool for quantitative prediction of fructose and glucose sugars in the pulp of Kenyan mangoes.
  • Background: Mangoes are fruits of nutritional importance in Kenya. The fruits vary in their sugars depending on cultivar type and ripening stage. Current methods of sugar content analysis are based on HPLC methods, which are accurate but expensive and time-consuming. We evaluated the potential of diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy as a rapid tool for quantitative prediction of fructose and glucose sugars in the pulp of Kenyan mangoes.Methods: Principal component analysis and partial least regression models were developed using the first derivative DRIFT spectra (400â??4000 cmâ??1) to predict fructose and glucose sugars. A factorial analysis of variance compared effects of site (three locations), cultivar type (four cultivars), fruit position (inside/outside), and their interactions on fructose and glucose contents.Results: The principal component analysis scores plot using components 1 and 2 explained 75 and 8% of the variance, respectively, with no clear grouping either by sites or cultivars. The PLS range for glucose was R2 = 0.80, SECV = 0.55, and RPD = 11.52 and fructose R2 = 0.70, SECV = 0.28, and RPD = 11.52. Site (F (2, 265) = 18.12, p 0.05. In general, fruits outside the canopy had higher fructose and glucose contents than those within the canopy.Conclusions: DRIFTS coupled with chemometric
  • Conclusions: DRIFTS coupled with chemometric techniques showed potential for prediction of fructose and glucose contents of mango fruits.
  • Methods: Principal component analysis and partial least regression models were developed using the first derivative DRIFT spectra (400-4000 cm(-1)) to predict fructose and glucose sugars. A factorial analysis of variance compared effects of site (three locations), cultivar type (four cultivars), fruit position (inside/outside), and their interactions on fructose and glucose contents.
  • Results: The principal component analysis scores plot using components 1 and 2 explained 75 and 8% of the variance, respectively, with no clear grouping either by sites or cultivars. The PLS range for glucose was R-2 = 0.80, SECV = 0.55, and RPD = 11.52 and fructose R-2 = 0.70, SECV = 0.28, and RPD = 11.52. Site (F (2, 265) = 18.12, p < 0.05, eta 2 = 0.02), cultivar type (F (3, 256) = 4.44, p < 0.05, eta 2 = 0.05), and fruit position (F (1, 259) = 7.62, p < 0.05, eta 2 = 0.03) had a significant effect on glucose content and not on fructose content. However, interactions between these three factors were not significant, p > 0.05. In general, fruits outside the canopy had higher fructose and glucose contents than those within the canopy.

publication date

  • 2017
  • 2017
  • 2017