Association Mapping of Ferrous, Zinc, and Aluminum Tolerance at the Seedling Stage in Indica Rice using MAGIC Populations. uri icon

abstract

  • Excessive amounts of metal are toxic and severely affect plant growth and development. Understanding the genetic control of metal tolerance is crucial to improve rice resistance to Fe, Zn, and Al toxicity. The multi-parent advanced generation inter-cross (MAGIC) populations were genotyped using a 55 K rice SNP array and screened at the seedling stage for Fe, Zn, and Al toxicity using a hydroponics system. Association analysis was conducted by implementing a mixed linear model (MLM) for each of the five MAGIC populations double cross DC1 (founders were SAGC-08, HHZ5-SAL9-Y3-Y1, BP1976B-2-3-7-TB-1-1, PR33282-B-8-1-1-1-1-1), double cross DC2 (founders of double cross were FFZ1, CT 16658-5-2-2SR-2-3-6MP, IR 68, IR 02A127), eight parents population 8way (founders were SAGC-08, HHZ5-SAL9-Y3-Y1, BP1976B-2-3-7-TB-1-1, PR33282-B-8-1-1-1-1-1, FFZ1, CT 16658-5-2-2SR-2-3-6MP, IR 68, IR 02A127), DC12 (DC1+DC2) and rice multi-parent recombinant inbred line population RMPRIL (DC1+DC2+8way). A total of 21, 30, and 21 QTL were identified for Fe, Zn, and Al toxicity tolerance, respectively. For multi tolerance (MT) as Fe, Zn, and Al tolerance-related traits, three genomic regions, MT1.1 (chr.1: 35.4-36.3 Mb), MT1.2 (chr.1: 35.4-36.3 Mb), and MT3.2 (chr.3: 35.4-36.2 Mb) harbored QTL. The chromosomal regions MT2.1 (chr.2: 2.4-2.8 Mb), MT2.2 (chr.2: 24.5-25.8 Mb), MT4 (chr.4: 1.2 Mb Mb), MT8.1 (chr.8: 0.7-0.9 Mb), and MT8.2 (chr.8: 2.2-2.4 Mb) harbored QTL for Fe and Zn tolerance, while MT2.3 (chr.2: 30.5-31.6 Mb), MT3.1 (chr.3: 12.5-12.8 Mb), and MT6 (chr.6: 2.0-3.0 Mb) possessed QTL for Al and Zn tolerance. The chromosomal region MT9.1 (chr.9: 14.2-14.7 Mb) possessed QTL for Fe and Al tolerance. A total of 11 QTL were detected across different MAGIC populations and 12 clustered regions were detected under different metal conditions, suggesting that these genomic regions might constitute valuable regions for further marker-assisted selection (MAS) in breeding programs.

publication date

  • 2017
  • 2017