Spot blotch disease of wheat: the current status of research on genetics and breeding uri icon

abstract

  • The spot blotch disease of wheat is caused by Bipolaris sorokiniana, which is an anamorph (teleomorph Cochliobolus sativus). The disease mainly occurs in warm, humid wheat-growing regions, and the Eastern Gangetic Plains (EGP) of South Asia is a hotspot. Significant progress has been made in recent years in characterizing the host-pathogen interaction. The study of the pathogen's life cycle and diversity have been an active area of research. A number of resistance sources have also been identified, characterized and used for breeding. Although immunity has not been observed in any genotype, cultivars displaying a relatively high level of resistance have been developed and made available to farmers. Further progress will require regular use of marker-assisted breeding, genomic selection, gene editing and transgenic interventions. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge about genetic and breeding efforts on the wheat-B.sorokiniana pathosystem and discusses ways in which emerging tools can be used for future research to understand the mechanism involved in infection and for developing cultivars exhibiting a high level of resistance.

publication date

  • 2018
  • 2018