Variation in Seed‐Quality Traits of Chickpea and Their Correlation to Raffinose Family Oligosaccharides Concentrations uri icon

abstract

  • Genetic resources with desired seed composition are needed to improve nutritional quality of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) seeds. A germplasm collection of 171 chickpea genotypes (desi and kabuli types) was characterized for selected seed quality traits (thousand-seed weight (TSW), starch, protein, and amylose) in one greenhouse and two field trials. Kabuli-type chickpea genotypes (115.7 to 537.4 g and 36.2 to 49.0%) had higher TSW and starch concentrations than desi types (114.6 to 332.4 g and 32.4 to 42.9%), respectively. Desi type chickpea genotypes (16.7 to 27.5%) showed a higher range for protein concentration than kabuli types (17.1 to 24.8%). However, amylose concentration did not vary significantly between desi (29.7 to 34.4%) and kabuli (29.2 to 35.0%) type chickpea genotypes. Genotype, environment, and their interaction showed a significant impact on selected seed-quality traits. Among the chickpea seed-quality traits studied, seed weight was the most heritable trait, and it showed significant positive correlation with starch concentration. Protein, amylose, and total raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFO) had significant negative correlation with TSW. However, total RFO concentration showed significant positive correlation to both starch and protein concentrations. The identified desi and kabuli genotypes can be used as new genetic resources in chickpea improvement programs to develop chickpea varieties with enhanced nutritional composition

publication date

  • 2017
  • 2017