Multiple domestications of the Mesoamerican gene pool of lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus L.): evidence from chloroplast DNA sequences uri icon

abstract

  • The Mesoamerican (MA) gene pool of lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus L.) is widely distributed from northern Mexico to northern Argentina in its wild forms and from the southern United States to the east coast of Brazil in its domesticated forms. This broad distribution and lack of wild accessions of the MA gene pool in many areas of its natural distribution has impeded determining its center of domestication and establishing whether it has a single or multiple centers. To answer these questions, we evaluated 262 accessions of P. lunatus using two intergenic spacers of chloroplast DNA: atpB-rbcL and trnL-trnF. The data were analyzed using a maximum likelihood tree (ML), a haplotype network and two estimators of genetic differentiation (N (ST) and G (ST)). Nucleotide diversity (pi) and haplotype (Hd) were quantified to estimate the percentage of reduction in genetic diversity (%r) as a founder effect. The ML tree and haplotype network indicated the existence of three groups (AI, MI and MII), which was supported by the high values of N (ST) (0.61-0.80). Values for %r were high (58.67-60.83 %). Existence of Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools was confirmed, with two genetically and geographically distinct groups (MI and MII) within the MA gene pool. We present the first evidence for multiple origins of domestication for the MA gene pool. For MI, we propose western central Mexico as the domestication area and between Guatemala and Costa Rica for MII. We observed a founder effect in the MA gene pool as a result of domestication.

publication date

  • 2013
  • 2013
  • 2013