Domestic use of dirty energy and its effects on human health : empirical evidence from Bhutan uri icon

abstract

  • Use of dirty fuels such as fuelwood, charcoal, cow dung and kerosene is common in developing countries, which adversely affects the health of people living in the dwellings, especially children and women. Using the data from a comprehensive and nationally representative Bhutan Living Standard Survey 2012, the present study examines the effects of dirty fuels on human health and household health expenditure. The result from propensity score-matching approach indicate that households using dirty fuels have a higher incidence of respiratory disease by 2.53% compared to households using cleaner fuels. The chances of household contracting tuberculosis are higher for households using dirty fuel in the range of 5-6%. It is also observed that the incidence of eye diseases and health expenditures among households using dirty fuels is higher. Hence the policy should focus on providing access to clean sources of energy to wider population.

publication date

  • 2017
  • 2017