In Vitro Bioaccessibility and Bioavailability of Iron from Potatoes with Varying Vitamin C, Carotenoid, and Phenolic Concentrations uri icon

abstract

  • The bioaccessibility and bioavailability of iron from 12 Andean potato clones were estimated using an in vitro gastrointestinal digestion procedure and the Caco-2 cell line as a model of human intestine, with ferritin formation as a marker of iron absorption. We first showed that 63.7% (for the genotype CIP_311422.016) to 79.0% (for the genotype CIP_311575.003) of the iron is released from the potato tuber matrix during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion and is therefore available at the intestinal level. On average, 32 and 24.5% of the hydrophilic bioactive components, vitamin C and chlorogenic acid, respectively, were also bioaccessible from boiled tubers. Intestinal absorption of intrinsic iron from potato tubers could not be detected using our in vitro Caco-2 cell model. When an extrinsic source of iron (20 mu M FeCl3 and 1 mM ascorbic acid) was added to the digestion mixture, iron absorption varied from 1.8 to 8% for the genotypes CIP_311422.016 and CIP_311624.021, respectively, as compared to the reference control. Principal component analysis revealed negative relationships between bioavailable iron values and phenolic concentrations, whereas vitamin C concentrations were positively associated with the ferritin values. Further controlled intervention trials would be needed to conclusively assess the bioavailability of intrinsic iron from potato tubers.
  • The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro iron availability from diverse iron biofortified International Potato Center (CIP) potato clones grown in the Peruvian Andes and, thereby, to provide key information to breeders seeking to increase bioavailable iron from potato

publication date

  • 2015
  • 2015
  • 2015