Crop response of aerobic rice and winter wheat to nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in a double cropping system uri icon

abstract

  • In the aerobic rice system, adapted rice cultivars are grown in non-flooded moist soil. Aerobic rice may be suitable for double cropping with winter wheat in the Huai River Basin, northern China plain. Field experiments in 2005 and 2006 were conducted to study the response of aerobic rice and winter wheat to sequential rates of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) in aerobic rice-winter wheat (AR-WW) and winter wheat-aerobic rice (WW-AR) cropping sequences. Fertilizer treatments consisted of a complete NPK dose, a PK dose (N omission), a NK dose (P omission), a NP dose (K omission), and a control with no fertilizer input. Grain yields of crops with a complete NPK dose ranged from 3.7 to 3.8 t ha(-1) and from 6.6 to 7.1 for aerobic rice' and 'winter wheat', respectively. N omissions caused yield reductions ranging from 0.5 to 0.8 t ha(-1) and from 1.6 to 4.3 t ha(-1) for rice and wheat, respectively. A single omission of P or K did not reduce rice and wheat yields, but a cumulative omission of P or K in a double cropping system significantly reduced wheat yields by 1.2-1.6 t ha(-1). N, P and K uptake of both crops were significantly influenced by fertilizer applications and indigenous soil nutrient supply. Nutrient omissions in a preceding crop reduced plant N and K contents and uptake additionally to direct effects of the fertilizer treatments in wheat, but not in rice. Apparent nutrient recoveries (ANR) differed strongly between 'aerobic rice' and 'winter wheat'; in rice: for N it ranged from 0.30 to 0.32, for P from 0.01 to 0.06, and for K from 0.03 to 0.19 and in wheat: for N from 0.49 to 0.71, for P from 0.09 to 0.15, and for K from 0.26 to 0.31. Further improvements of crop productivity as well as nutrient-use efficiencies, should be brought about by developing cropping systems, by an appropriate choice of adapted cultivars, by a site- and time-specific fertilizer management and by eliminating other yield-limiting factors. It is concluded that nutrient recommendations should not be based on the yield response of single crops only, but also on the after-effects on nutrient availability for succeeding crops. A whole cropping system approach is needed.

publication date

  • 2010
  • 2010