Wheat breeders' perspectives on genetic diversity and germplasm use: Findings from an international survey uri icon

abstract

  • Wheat breeders working in national wheat research programmes around the world, and particularly those in developing countries, are concerned that in the future scientific advance may be limited because wheat genetic diversity is not available for their use. Those surveyed use advanced lines and released varieties more often than other types of germplasm in their crosses, but they use wild relatives and landraces in the pursuit of specific breeding objectives, such as disease resistance, tolerance of abiotic stress, and grain quality. CIMMYT germplasm is used at least as often in breeding for disease resistance as for yield. The crossing blocks in developing countries contain larger sections of landrace materials and lines from CIMMYT International Nurseries, and as a result, may be more genetically diverse in terms of types and geographical origin of parent materials than those used in high-income countries, or the FSU and Eastern Europe. All of the wheat breeders surveyed in high-income countries stated that their country uses varietal protection, as compared with only half of those in developing countries. Responses suggest that the establishment of global regimes for varietal protection would reduce the exchange of useful materials among developing nations as well as between developing and industrialized nations
  • Wheat breeders working in national wheat research programmes around the world, and particularly those in developing countries, are concerned that in the future scientific advance may be limited because wheat genetic diversity is not available for their use. Those surveyed use advanced lines and released varieties more often than other types of germplasm in their crosses, but they use wild relatives and landraces in the pursuit of specific breeding objectives, such as disease resistance, tolerance of abiotic stress, and grain quality. CIMMYT germplasm is used at least as often in breeding for disease resistance as for yield. The crossing blocks in developing countries contain larger sections of landrace materials and lines from CIMMYT International Nurseries, and as a result, may be more genetically diverse in terms of types and geographical origin of parent materials than those used in high-income countries, or the FSU and Eastern Europe. All of the wheat breeders surveyed in high-income countries stated that their country uses varietal protection, as compared with only half of those in developing countries. Responses suggest that the establishment of global regimes for varietal protection would reduce the exchange of useful materials among developing nations as well as between developing and industrialized nations.

publication date

  • 1996
  • 1996
  • 1996
  • 1996