Estimation of genetic components of variation for salt tolerance in chickpea using the generation mean analysis uri icon

abstract

  • Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is known to be salt-sensitive and in many regions of the world its yields are restricted by salinity. Recent identification of large variation in chickpea yield under salinity, if genetically controlled, offers an opportunity to develop cultivars with improved salt tolerance. Two chickpea land races, ICC 6263 (salt sensitive) and ICC 1431 (salt tolerant), were inter-crossed to study gene action involved in different agronomic traits under saline and control conditions. The generation mean analysis in six populations, viz. P1, P2, F1, F2, BC1P1 and BC1P2, revealed significant gene interactions for days to flowering, days to maturity, and stem Na and K concentrations in control and saline treatments, as well as for 100-seed weight under salinity. Seed yield, pods per plant, seeds per plant, and stem Cl concentration were controlled by additive effects under saline conditions. Broad-sense heritability values (>0.5) for most traits were generally higher in saline than in control conditions, whereas the narrow-sense heritability values for yield traits, and stem Na and K concentrations, were lower in saline than control conditions. The influence of the sensitive parent was higher on the expression of different traits; the additive and dominant genes acted in opposite directions which led to lower heritability estimates in early generations. These results indicate that selection for yield under salinity would be more effective in later filial generations after gene fixation

publication date

  • 2011
  • 2011