Parent Support Improves Weight Loss in Adolescents and Young Adults with Down Syndrome uri icon

abstract

  • Conclusion Parent-supported behavioral intervention appears to be a successful adjunct to a 6-month nutrition education intervention in achieving weight loss in adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome.
  • Objective To assess whether parent training in behavioral intervention, combined with a 16-session nutrition and activity education program, would improve weight loss relative to nutrition and activity education alone in adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome.
  • Results At 6 months, mean body weight in the nutrition and activity education+ behavioral intervention group was 3.2 kg lower than that in the nutrition and activity education group (95% CI, 1.0-5.5 kg; P =.005). Mean group differences were sustained at 1 year (3.6 kg; 95% CI, 1.4-5.9 kg; P =.002). At 6 months, moderate/ vigorous physical activity time increased by an average of 18 minutes/ day compared with baseline in the nutrition and activity education+ behavioral intervention group (P =.01) and decreased by 7 minutes/ day in the nutrition and activity education group (P =.30). These changes were largely maintained at 1 year, but were not statistically significant. Vegetable intake in the nutrition and activity education+ behavioral intervention group exceeded that in the nutrition and activity education group by a mean of 1.6 servings at 1 year (P =.009), but not at 6 months. No between-group differences were observed for percentage body fat or consumption of fruits or treats.
  • Study design Twenty-one patients with Down syndrome aged 13-26 years with a body mass index $ 85th percentile were enrolled and randomized to a 6-month nutrition and activity education intervention (n = 10) or to a nutrition and activity education+ behaviorial intervention (n = 11), and followed for 6 months after the active intervention period (1-year follow-up). The primary outcome measure was body weight; secondary outcomes included percentage body fat by bioelectric impedance; intake of fruits, vegetables, and energy-dense low-nutrient snack food (treats) by 3-day food record; and moderate/ vigorous physical activity by accelerometry.

publication date

  • 2013
  • 2013