Within-Plant Migration of the Predatory Mite Typhlodromalus aripo from the Apex to the Leaves of Cassava: Response to Day-Night Cycle, Prey Location and Prey Density uri icon

abstract

  • Under attack by herbivores, plants produce a blend of "herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPV)" that help natural enemies of herbivores locating their prey, thereby helping plants to reduce damage from herbivory. The amount of HIPV emitted by plants increases with herbivore density and is positively correlated with the intensity of the olfactory response of natural enemies. In this study, we determined the effects of density or within-plant distribution of the herbivorous mite Mononychellus tanajoa on movement of the predatory mite Typhlodromalus aripo out of apices of cassava plants. Proportions of T. aripo that migrated out of apex, and distances traveled were significantly higher when M. tanajoa was further away from the apex-i.e. on middle or bottom leaves of cassava plants-than when present on top leaves, or absent from the plant. This supports previous field observations that T. aripo is not a sit-and-wait predator but uses HIPV to search and locate its prey within cassava plant.

publication date

  • 2009
  • 2009
  • 2009
  • 2009