Evaluation of Ethiopian chickpea ( Cicer arietinum L.) germplasm accessions for symbio-agronomic performance uri icon

abstract

  • Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is an economically and ecologically important food legume crop. Ethiopia has a large collection of chickpea germplasm accessions; but, it has not been extensively characterized for desirable sources of agronomic and symbiotic significance for use in breeding programs. A study was conducted at two locations (Ambo and Ginchi) in 2009/2010 to characterize and evaluate Ethiopian chickpea germplasm accessions for symbiotic and agronomic performance. One hundred and thirty-nine germplasm accessions were evaluated with 16 other genotypes including non-nodulating reference checks. Differences among genotypes, locations and genotype by location interaction effects were significant for a number of characters. A number of accessions better performing over the improved genotypes were identified for both symbiotic and agronomic characters. The amount of fixed nitrogen ranged from 13 to 49% in foliage, 30 to 44% in grain and 28 to 40% in total above-ground biomass. Grain yield performance varied from 31 to 70g per 5 plants and seed size ranged from 82 to 288g per 1000 seeds. For both symbiotic and agronomic characters, landraces were found to be overwhelmingly superior to introduced genotypes, except for seed size, where the best genotypes were all from exotic sources. The result indicated that Ethiopian chickpea landraces have better genetic potential for improving a number of symbiotic and agronomic characters over the varieties currently in use. Selection of best individuals within and among the accessions would be expected to be effective.

publication date

  • 2013
  • 2013