Genetic selection within Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) in Europe for papermaking uses uri icon

abstract

  • The study aims to identify the feasibility and the relevance of a genetic selection for enhancing the pulping potential of the Douglas fir wood. At first, wood predictors for TMP potential are identified through the refining of thirty trees 17-year-old, using a specific procedure on a 12" Andritz refiner. The variations of TMP physical properties are linked with those of anatomical parameters, but also with within ring density related traits. The brightness of the unbleached TMP is negatively correlated with the red chromatic component of wood. Lignin, holocellulose and extractives content on one hand, Kraft fibre morphology on the other hand are considered to evaluate roughly the wood potential for the Kraft process. Then 15 clones out of 200 are non destructively selected within a 24-year-old German test to evaluate the range of the genetic variation of the papermaking potential. Chemical analyses give evidence of large variations of the chemical composition ratio between clones (holocellulose/lignin ratio). The clone discrimination of the fibre length is weak, but significant differences of fibre coarseness are observed as a consequence of the large variability of the latewood density levels. The industrial selection gain for pulping is discussed on the basis of TMP pilot plant tests which show large differences of physical and optical TMP properties between average wood assortments of each clone. This leads to practical recommendations for breeders considering the expectations of both the pulping and the wood industry.

publication date

  • 2002
  • 2002