Phylogenetic diversity of Mesorhizobium in chickpea uri icon

abstract

  • Crop domestication, in general, has reduced genetic diversity in cultivated gene pool of chickpea (Cicer arietinum) as compared with wild species (C. reticulatum, C. bijugum). To explore impact of domestication on symbiosis, 10 accessions of chickpeas, including 4 accessions of C. arietinum, and 3 accessions of each of C. reticulatum and C. bijugum species, were selected and DNAs were extracted from their nodules. To distinguish chickpea symbiont, preliminary sequences analysis was attempted with 9 genes (16S rRNA, atpD, dnaJ, glnA, gyrB, nifH, nifK, nodD and recA) of which 3 genes (gyrB, nifK and nodD) were selected based on sufficient sequence diversity for further phylogenetic analysis. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence diversity for 3 genes demonstrated that sequences from C. reticulatum were more diverse. Nodule occupancy by dominant symbiont also indicated that C. reticulatum (60%) could have more various symbionts than cultivated chickpea (80%). The study demonstrated that wild chickpeas (C. reticulatum) could be used for selecting more diverse symbionts in the field conditions and it implies that chickpea domestication affected symbiosis negatively in addition to reducing genetic diversity.
  • Crop domestication, in general, has reduced genetic diversity in cultivated gene pool of chickpea (Cicer arietinum) ascompared with wild species (C. reticulatum, C. bijugum). To explore impact of domestication on symbiosis, 10accessions of chickpeas, including 4 accessions of C. arietinum, and 3 accessions of each of C. reticulatumand C. bijugum species, were selected and DNAs were extracted from their nodules. To distinguish chickpeasymbiont, preliminary sequences analysis was attempted with 9 genes (16S rRNA, atpD, dnaJ, glnA, gyrB, nifH,nifK, nodD and recA) of which 3 genes (gyrB, nifK and nodD) were selected based on sufficient sequence diversityfor further phylogenetic analysis. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence diversity for 3 genes demonstrated thatsequences from C. reticulatum were more diverse. Nodule occupancy by dominant symbiont also indicated thatC. reticulatum (60%) could have more various symbionts than cultivated chickpea (80%). The study demonstratedthat wild chickpeas (C. reticulatum) could be used for selecting more diverse symbionts in the field conditions and itimplies that chickpea domestication affected symbiosis negatively in addition to reducing genetic diversity

publication date

  • 2014
  • 2014
  • 2014