Root and Crown Rot Fungi Associated with Spring, Facultative, and Winter Wheat in Turkey uri icon

abstract

  • The objective of this study was to determine the distribution frequency of the fungi associated with wheat (Triticum aestivum) crowns and roots in cereal producing areas of Turkey through a targeted survey of 518 commercial field, over a 2-year period. More than 26% of the fields had one or more of the fungal species commonly reported as part of the dryland root rot complex, Fusarium culmorum (14%) > Bipolaris sorokiniana (10%) > F. pseudograminearum (2%). The fungi considered to be part of the high rainfall root rot complex were found at very low frequencies: 2% for Gaeumannomyces graminis and 3% for Pythium spp. Species of Rhizoctonia were found in 22% of the fields. Several Fusarium species considered to be less or nonpathogenic to cereals were also found in high frequencies at 11% (F. oxysporum, F. chlamydosporum), 10% (F. sporotrichioides), and 8% (F. avenaceum and F. solani). The mostly random distribution of cereal root-rotting species across the survey area suggests the fungi are not distributed in any distinct agroecological relationship. As a result, the relative economic importance of a given species on wheat will be determined by a number of factors, such as their fungal pathogenicity, host susceptibility/tolerance, and the seasonal conditions. Results from this study suggest that there are a wide range of fungal species associated with root and crown tissues of wheat.
  • The objective of this study was to determine the distribution frequency of the fungi associated with wheat (Triticum aestivum) crowns and roots in cereal producing areas of Turkey through a targeted survey of 518 commercial fields over a 2-year period. More than 26% of the fields had one or more of the fungal species commonly reported as part of the dryland root rot complex, Fusarium culmorum (14%) > Bipolaris sorokiniana (10%) > F. pseudograminearum (2%). The fungi considered to be part of the high rainfall root rot complex were found at very low frequencies: 2% for Gaeumannomyces graminis and 3% for Pythium spp. Species of Rhizoctonia were found in 22% of the fields. Several Fusarium species considered to be less or nonpathogenic to cereals were also found in high frequencies at 11% (F. oxysporum, F. chlamydosporum), 10% (F. sporotrichioides), and 8% (F. avenaceum and F. solani). The mostly random distribution of cereal root-rotting species across the survey area suggests the fungi are not distributed in any distinct agroecological relationship. As a result, the relative economic importance of a given species on wheat will be determined by a number of factors, such as their fungal pathogenicity, host susceptibility/tolerance, and the seasonal conditions. Results from this study suggest that there are a wide range of fungal species associated with root and crown tissues of wheat

publication date

  • 2008
  • 2008
  • 2008