FOOD AID AND CHILD NUTRITION IN RURAL ETHIOPIA uri icon

abstract

  • Food aid programs have become increasingly important for disaster relief in many developing countries. In Ethiopia, a drought-stricken economy with one of the lowest per capita incomes in the world, food aid has amounted to almost 10 million metric tons (mt) from 1984 to 1998, almost 10 percent of annual cereal production. Because of the importance of food aid in Ethiopia, much effort has been devoted to evaluation of its effectiveness.....Many evaluations of food aid have examined its impact on household calorie availability. This paper focuses on the effects of food aid on individual nutritional status, as measured by indicators of child nutrition
  • This paper uses a unique panel data set from Ethiopia to examine the determinants of participation in and receipts of food aid through free distribution (FD) and food-for-work (FFW). Results show that aggregate rainfall and livestock shocks increase household participation in both FD and FFW. FFW also seems well targeted to asset-poor households. The probability of receiving FD does not appear to be targeted based on household wealth, but FD receipts are lower for wealthier households. The effects of FD and FFW on child nutritional status differ depending on the modality of food aid and the gender of the child. Both FFW and FD have a positive direct impact on weight for height. Households invest proceeds from FD in girls' nutrition, while earnings from FFW are manifested in better nutrition for boys. The effects of the gender of the aid recipient are not conclusive. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

publication date

  • 2003
  • 2003
  • 2003
  • 2003