A comparative study on population development patterns of Sogatella furcifera between tropical and subtropical areas uri icon

abstract

  • The White-backed Planthopper (WBPH), Sogatella furcifera (Horvath (Hemiptera: Delphacidae)) has been the most serious pest threatening rice production in Asia since the late 1970s. A series of field experiments using the same research protocol was carried out to compare the effects of main environmental factors on population development of WBPH in tropical (Philippines) and subtropical (China) areas in 2010-2012 and to provide further evidences of ecological mechanisms involved that cause frequent outbreak in subtropical rice. Outcomes showed that WBPH population in subtropical area could be characterized as the higher population growth rates and higher peak densities. The average growth rate (116.60 +/- 46.16) in subtropical area was significantly higher than that in tropical area (24.02 +/- 11.25). The higher realized fecundity in subtropical area indicated that the higher growth rates and higher peak densities were mainly related to the poor natural regulating forces in subtropical area. Our results showed that resistant variety could significantly reduce the peak density in subtropical areas, but not in tropical areas. We inferred that the reason for not detecting the effect of resistant variety in tropical area was due to the dominant controlling effects provided by natural enemies, which means that the natural regulating effect in tropical area was strong enough to disguise the effects of resistant variety. The significant interactions between plant resistance and location demonstrated that integration of natural enemies and use of plant resistance could play important roles for reducing outbreak frequency of WBPH effectively in subtropical rice. (C) 2014 Korean Society of Applied Entomology, Taiwan Entomological Society and Malaysian Plant Protection Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

publication date

  • 2014
  • 2014