Traditional Processing of Black and White Chuño in the Peruvian Andes: Regional Variants and Effect on the Mineral Content of Native Potato Cultivars uri icon

abstract

  • Traditional Processing of Black and White Chuo in the Peruvian Andes: Regional Variants and Effect on the Mineral Content of Native Potato Cultivars. Farmers in the high Andes of central to southern Peru and Bolivia typically freeze-dry potatoes to obtain chuo. Processing of so-called black chuo follows tending, treading, freezing, and drying. The making of white chuo is generally more complex and involves exposure of tubers to water. Regional variants exist for each of these processes, yet their influence on the nutritional composition of native potato cultivars is little known. Tubers belonging to four distinct cultivars and produced in a replicated trial under uniform conditions were processed into four types of chuo following standard traditional procedures (farmer-managed). These regional variants were documented, and the dry matter, iron, zinc, calcium, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, and sodium content of the four resulting different types of boiled chuo determined at the International Potato Center's Quality and Nutrition Laboratory (Lima, Peru). Content values were compared with those of boiled (unprocessed) tubers from the same experiment. Regional variants of processing are to a large extent determined by tradition, environmental condition, and market demand. The zinc, potassium, phosphorus, and magnesium content of all types of chuo decreases in comparison with unprocessed tubers. Concentrations of these same minerals decrease more drastically for white as compared to black chuo. The effect of the four regional variants of freeze-drying on the dry matter, iron, calcium, and sodium content of chuo differs by process and/or cultivar.

publication date

  • 2010
  • 2010