Hierarchical and factorial mating designs for quantitative genetic analysis in tetrasomic potato. uri icon

abstract

  • Plant breeders need to quantify additive and non-additive components of genetic variance in order to determine appropriate selection methods to improve quantitative characteristics. Hierarchical and factorial mating designs (also known as North Carolina mating designs I and II, respectively) allow one to determine these variance components. The relative advantages of these two designs in the quantitative genetics of tuber yield in tetrasomic potato were investigated. Likewise, the number of female parents to include in design I was also investigated. Data were collected from two independent experiments at two contrasting Peruvian locations: La Molina in the dry coast and San Ramon in the humid mid-altitude. In the first experiment, although design I gave a negative digenic variance (sigma(D)(2)), this design provided almost the same estimate of narrow-sense heritability (h) for tuber yield as that obtained in design II (0.291 and 0.260, respectively). Therefore, design I appears to be appropriate for quantitative genetics research in tetrasomic potato, a crop in which some clones are male sterile. The easy handling of crosses (distinct random females included in the crossing scheme) is another advantage of design I relative to design II. In the second experiment, 12 males were crossed with either two or four females following a design-I mating scheme: The additive genetic variance (sigma(A)(2)) was zero (or negative) when two females per male were included but was positive with four females. These results suggest that two females per male may not be enough for design I in tetrasomic potato. Four females per male are preferable to determine sigma(A)(2) in design I for this tetrasomic crop.

publication date

  • 2002
  • 2002