Manihot flabellifolia Pohl, wild source of resistance to the whitefly Aleurotrachelus socialis Bondar (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) uri icon

abstract

  • Aleurotrachelus socialis is one of the most important pests of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) in the Neotropics. In Colombia, high whitefly populations can reduce crop yields by 79%: and although the farmers intensify the use of insecticides, this practice is highly contaminating, costly and leads to the development of resistance in the insect. An alternative for managing whitefly populations is to develop genetically resistant varieties. Wild parents of Manihot are a useful source of genes against pests for the cultivated species of cassava. Based on prior research that showed the existence of moderate-to-high levels of resistance to A. socialis in Manihot flabellifolia, a wild species of cassava, this study was proposed to characterize this new source of resistance, evaluating the biology and demographics of A. socialis on eight accessions of M. flabellifolia, a susceptible check (CMC-40) and a resistant (MEcu72) check. The averages of A. socialis longevity and fecundity on the accessions were not significantly different to MEcu72, but different from CMC-40 (P < 0.05). Development time was not significantly different, ranging from 35-40 days on accessions and MEcu72 and 33.5 days on CMC-40 (P < 0.05). In contrast, the population growth rate (r(m)) was significantly lower on the M. flabellifolia accessions, with Fla 61 standing out with a growth rate 98 and 99% less than that obtained on MEcu72 and CMC-40, respectively. Once the resistant levels have been identified to A. socialis on the M. flabellifolia accessions, interspecific crosses of M. esculenta subsp. M. flabellifolia and backcross programs could be developed to incorporate the desirable characteristics from the wild relatives into elite progenitors of M. esculenta. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

publication date

  • 2010
  • 2010