Interactions between panicle size, insect density, and environment for genotypic resistance in sorghum to head bug, Calocoris angustatus uri icon

abstract

  • Studies were undertaken on interactions between panicle size, insect density, host plant, and the environment for sorghum head bug, Calocoris angustatus Lethiery on five sorghum genotypes in terms of bug population increase, grain damage and loss in grain mass across four panicle sizes (5, 10 or 20 branches/panicle and whole panicle), and three infestation levels (5, 10 and 15 pairs of bugs/panicle). Head bug numbers increased and grain damage decreased with an increase in panicle size in the head bug susceptible cultivars, CSH 1 and CSH 5. However, the increase in bug numbers or decrease in grain damage was not significant in head bug resistant genotypes, IS 17610 and IS 17645. Head bug numbers increased with an increase in infestation level in CSH 1 and CSH 5, however, such an increase was not substantial in IS 17610 and IS 17645. Grain damage was significantly lower in IS 17610 and IS 17645 compared with CSH 1 and CSH 5 across infestation levels. Head bug population increased at a greater rate during the rainy season compared with the dry season. Panicle size and infestation levels accounted for greater variation in grain damage and percentage loss in grain mass during the rainy season than in the dry season. To identify reliable sources of resistance to insects, it is important to study insect host plant-interactions across panicle sizes (levels of food availability), infestation levels and season

publication date

  • 1994
  • 1994