Genetic Gains in Grain Yield Through Genomic Selection in Eight Bi-parental Maize Populations under Drought Stress uri icon

abstract

  • Genomic selection incorporates all the available marker information into a model to predict genetic values of breeding progenies for selection. The objective of this study was to estimate genetic gains in grain yield from genomic selection (GS) in eight bi-parental maize populations under managed drought stress environments. In each population, 148 to 300 F-2:3 (C-0) progenies were derived and crossed to a single-cross tester from a complementary heterotic group. The resulting testcrosses of each population were evaluated under two to four managed drought stress and three to four well-watered conditions in different locations and genotyped with 191 to 286 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. The top 10% families were selected from C-0 using a phenotypic selection index and were intermated to form C-1. Selections both at C-1 and C-2 were based on genomic estimated breeding values (GEBVs). The best lines from C-0 were also advanced using a pedigree selection scheme. For genetic gain studies, a total of 55 entries representing the eight populations were crossed to a single-cross tester, and evaluated in four managed drought stress environments. Each population was represented by bulk seed containing equal amounts of seed of C-0, C-1, C-2, C-3, parents, F(1)s, and lines developed via pedigree selection. Five commercial checks were included for comparison. The average gain from genomic selection per cycle across eight populations was 0.086 Mg ha(-1). The average grain yield of C-3-derived hybrids was significantly higher than that of hybrids derived from C-0. Hybrids derived from C-3 produced 7.3% (0.176 Mg ha(-1)) higher grain yield than those developed through the conventional pedigree breeding method. The study demonstrated that genomic selection is more effective than pedigree-based conventional phenotypic selection for increasing genetic gains in grain yield under drought stress in tropical maize.

publication date

  • 2015
  • 2015