Prioritizing underutilized tree species for domestication in smallholder systems of West Java. uri icon

abstract

  • This paper provides an overview of a tree species prioritization study of underutilized tree species in a participatory tree domestication program for smallholders in Indonesia. The study was conducted in three villages of Nanggung sub-district, Bogor district via farmer surveys, focus group discussion, SWOT analysis and evaluation of markets and germplasm sources. Five priority species were identified: Manglietia glauca, Parkia speciosa, Durio zibethinus, Gmelina arborea and Sandoricum koetjape. These species are promising components of agroforestry systems to enhance smallholder livelihoods and can grow under the low management conditions common in smallholder systems. They represent indigenous and exotic tree types that produce timber, fruit or spices within the domestication continuum. Furthering the domestication and utilization of these species requires the identification and dissemination of available germplasm sources, the dissemination of high-quality germplasm and the development of farmer-friendly propagation and tree management practices. Also, as with most smallholder systems, the marketing practices for the products of these five species require improvement, starting with the production of reliable quantities of high quality tree products.
  • This paper provides an overview of a tree species prioritization study of underutilized tree species in a participatory tree domestication program for smallholders in Indonesia. The study was conducted in three villages of Nanggung subdistrict, Bogor district via farmer surveys, focus group discussion, SWOT analysis and evaluation of markets and germplasm sources. Five priority species were identified: Manglietia glauca, Parkia speciosa, Durio zibethinus, Gmelina arborea and Sandoricum koetjape. These species are promising components of agroforestry systems to enhance smallholder livelihoods and can grow under the low management conditions common in smallholder systems. They represent indigenous and exotic tree types that produce timber, fruit or spices within the domestication continuum. Furthering the domestication and utilization of these species requires the identification and dissemination of available germplasm sources, the dissemination of high-quality germplasm and the development of farmer-friendly propagation and tree management practices. Also, as with most smallholder systems, the marketing practices for the products of these five species require improvement, starting with the production of reliable quantities of high quality tree products

publication date

  • 2013
  • 2013
  • 2013