Potato fungicides interfere with entomopathogenic fungi impacting population dynamics of green peach aphid uri icon

abstract

  • Fungicides applied to potato can enhance green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), outbreaks by interference with entomopathogenic fungi. (Order Entomophthorales). Late season aphid numbers were highest in potatoes sprayed with metalaxyl + mancozeb, captafol, or mancozeb, and lowest in potatoes sprayed with benomyl, triphenyltin hydroxide, chlorothalonil, or copper hydroxide. In field-collected aphids, Pandora (= Ernyia) neoaphidis (Remaudiere et Hennebert) and Entomophthora planchoniana Cornu (F. Entomophthtoraceae) were the predominant cause of mycoses, 66.7% and 22.3%, respectively. Conidiobolus obscurus (Hall and Dunn) Remaudiee and Keller (F. Ancylistaceae) accounted for 8.5% of mycoses. In the laboratory, fungicides were shown to have direct effects on these entomopathogens. Metalaxyl + mancozeb, mancozeb and captafol were strongly inhibitory of germination of conidia, copper hydroxide was intermediate, and chlorothalonil had little effect. Triphenyltin hydroxide, benomyl, metalaxyl + mancozeb, and mancozeb were strongly inhibitory of growth of mycelia, copper hydroxide was intermediate, and chlorothalonil and copper hydroxide had least effect. Benomyl was highly toxic to green peach aphid, copper hydroxide and chlorothalonil intermediate, and captafol, mancozeb, and metalaxyl + mancozeb least toxic. Possible interference of potato fungicides with aphid pathogens is now an important consideration because of the intensity of spraying required to protect the crop from infection by metalaxyl-resistant strains of the late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary. Minnesota potato growers reported high green peach pressure in both 1995 and 1996, years of intensive fungicide spraying. Concomitantly, there was a marked increased in the incidence of PLRV in seed lots entered for winter testing.

publication date

  • 1998
  • 1998