Host resistance stability to downy mildew in pearl millet and pathogenic variability in Sclerospora graminicola uri icon

abstract

  • Downy mildew, caused by Sclerospora graminicola, is a major pathogen of pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum) in Asia and Africa. So development of resistant cultivars has been a major goal of national and international breeding programs. Stability of resistance in pearl millet lines developed at ICRISAT was studied through a collaborative International Pearl Millet Downy Mildew Virulence Nursery (IPMDMVN). The reactions to downy mildew of 11 pearl millet lines at 17 locations in India, Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger, and Nigeria from 1995 to 1999 were recorded. Disease incidence varied significantly among lines, locations, and years. The tested pearl millet lines exhibited significant differential resistance. Resistance in lines IP 18292, IP 18293, 700651 and P 310-17 was most stable regardless of the location or season. Analysis of the variation in resistance also suggested that the resistance in IP 18292 and IP 18293 was variable and depended on the locations and years, while the resistance in 700651 and P 310-17 was highly stable across locations and over years. The latter two lines could prove to be the most valuable sources of downy mildew resistance. The results also revealed significant differences in S. graminicola populations at different locations, with the highest disease at Bagauda (Nigeria) and Durgapura (India) and lowest from Coimbatore and Aurangabad (India). Based on the reaction of the 11 pearl millet lines, the 17 S. graminicola populations were grouped into six putative pathotypes (undefined populations closer to races)

publication date

  • 2004
  • 2004