Effects of Plant Contact, Inoculation Pattern, Leaf Wetness Regime, and Nitrogen Supply on Inoculum Efficiency in Rice Sheath Blight uri icon

abstract

  • An experimental design was developed which allowed the measurement of inoculum efficiency (IE) represented by lesions of a leaf-borne disease such as rice sheath blight. In this design, IE is measured as the ratio of newly established lesions on trap plants relative to the inoculum present in a canopy, i.e., lesions artificially established on source plants. IE of the rice sheath blight pathogen, Rhizoctonia solani, was studied under semi-controlled conditions in which the effects of the following factors were measured: contact frequency among host tissues, amount and location of inoculum in the canopy, leaf wetness regime, and nitrogen content of the host plant. The conduciveness of these factors to sheath blight infection was measured in terms of IE which was expressed as the ratio of the density of daughter lesions on trap rice hills to the density of mother lesions on the inoculated quadrat hills. IE generally declined with the three successive batches of trap hills used in the experiments. It was significantly higher at closer plant spacings and under interrupted leaf wetness regimes. IE was not affected by the amount, nor by the location, of inoculum (mother lesions) in the canopy, but was significantly lower in hills with high total nitrogen content.

publication date

  • 1996
  • 1996
  • 1996