Increased storage protein from interspecific F1 hybrids between cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) and its wild progenitor (M. esculenta ssp. flabellifolia) uri icon

abstract

  • Cassava is an important food security crop in the developing world, as it is adapted to a wide range of climatic conditions including marginal semi-arid agro-ecologies. Cassava is a starchy staple and the storage roots of commercial cassava cultivar are very low in protein content (0.5-2%, dry weight basis). A diet predominantly based on cassava, as is the case in several sub-Saharan countries, could lead to malnutrition, especially in young children over time. A wild progenitor of cassava, Manihot esculenta ssp. flabellifolia have been found to have high root protein content, up to 18% (dry weight basis) and is excellent source of genetic variability for this important trait. Accessions of M. esculenta ssp. flabellifolia with high storage root protein content were crossed with commercial cassava cultivars. High content of storage root protein ranged from 2.87 to 11.25% could be recovered in the F-1 progenies. The F-1 families had an average dry matter content of 29.6%. These F-1 interspecific hybrids would be an entry point for improvement of cassava storage root protein content. A brief discussion of the strategy to be followed is presented.

publication date

  • 2012
  • 2012
  • 2012