Variation in root penetration ability, osmotic adjustment and dehydration tolerance among accessions of rice adapted to rainfed lowland and upland ecosystems uri icon

abstract

  • Drought is the major constraint limiting rainfed rice production. The ability or rice roots so penetrate compacted soils and therefore so increase water extraction capacity, osmotic adjustment and dehydration tolerance of leaves enables the plans to tolerate drought. Experiments were conducted to determine the extent of genetic variation in root penetration index, osmotic adjustment and dehydration tolerance among indica accessions adapted to rainfed lowlands as well as traditional varieties from rainfed uplands. Root penetration index was evaluated in a system using wax-petrolatum layers to simulate soil compaction. Osmotic adjustment and dehydration tolerance were studied under slow development of water stress. Substantial genetic variation was found for root penetration index. osmotic adjustment and dehydration tolerance among indica ecotypes from lowlands, and the study of several traditional varieties from uplands showed variation in root penetration index and related root traits. An indica accession. IR58821-23-B-1-2-1 had a high root penetration index of 0.38. The accessions, IR61079-33-1-2-2-3. IR62266-42-6-2 and IR63919-38-B-1 had high osmotic adjustment capacities (1.91. 1.90 and 1.78 MPa. respectively); IR61079-33-1-2-2-3 also had high dehydration tolerance. Good osmotic adjustment and dehydration tolerance were associated with poor root system. The traditional varieties -Kallurundaikar' and 'Norungan' had higher root penetration indices (0.46 and 0.43. respectively). than even the japonica accessions. The study identified indica accessions and traditional varieties with superior root- and shoot-related drought resistance traits that could be used in breeding for drought resistance in rice. In rice.

publication date

  • 2001
  • 2001