Host-plant resistance to insects in sorghum and its role in integrated pest management. uri icon

abstract

  • Sorghum is one of the most important cereal crops in Asia, Africa and Latin America. It is damaged by >150 insect species, of which sorghum shoot fly (Atherigona soccata Rond.), stem borers (Chilo partellus Swin., Busseola fusca Fuller, Eldana saccharina Wlk., Sesamia spp. and Diatraea saccharalis Wlk.), armyworms (Mythimna separata Wlk., Spodoptera exempta Wlk. and S. frugiperda J. E. Smith), aphids (Melanaphis sacchari Zehnt., Schizaphis graminum Rond. and Rhopalosiphum maidis Fitch.), mites (Oligonychus spp.), midge (Contarinia sorghicola Coq.), head bugs (Calocoris angustatus Leth., Eurystylus immaculatus Odh. and Oebalus spp.) and head caterpillars (Helicoverpa armigera Hb., Eublemma spp. Pyroderces simplex Wsm., Cryptoblabes spp. and Nola spp.) are the major pests world wide. Considerable progress has been made in screening and breeding for resistance to shoot fly, stem borers, greenbug, midge, armyworms and head bugs. Resistance to major pests is available in diverse genotypes. It is possible to combine resistance to two or more insect species in some cases (e.g. shoot fly and stem borer, stem borer and armyworms, midge and aphids and head bugs and head caterpillars). However, it may be quite difficult to combine resistance to some insect species (e.g. shoot fly versus midge and/or head bugs). Host-plant resistance can be used for the management of sorghum midge, greenbug, mites, aphids and head caterpillars. However, host-plant resistance need to be supplemented with other methods of pest control for shoot fly, stem borers. armyworms and head bugs

publication date

  • 1993
  • 1993