Understanding the differential nitrogen sensing mechanism in rice genotypes through expression analysis of high and low affinity ammonium transporter genes. uri icon

abstract

  • Two rice genotypes, Kalanamak 3119 (KN3119) and Pusa Basmati 1(PB1) differing in their optimum nitrogen requirements (30 and 120 kg/ha, respectively) were undertaken to study the expression of both high and low affinity ammonium transporter genes responsible for ammonium uptake. Exposing the roots of the seedlings of both the genotypes to increasing (NH4)(2)SO4 concentrations revealed that all the three families of rice AMT genes are expressed, some of which get altered in a genotype and concentration specific manner. This indicates that individual ammonium transporter genes have defined contributions for ammonium uptake and plant growth. Interestingly, in response to increasing nitrogen concentrations, a root specific high affinity gene, AMT1;3, was repressed in the roots of KN3119 but not in PB1 indicating the existence of a differential ammonium sensing mechanism. This also indicates that not only AMT1;3 is involved not only in ammonium uptake but may also in ammonium sensing. Further, if it can differentiate and could be used as a biomarker for nitrogen responsiveness. Expression analysis of low affinity AMT genes showed that, both AMT2;1 and AMT2;2 have high levels of expression in both roots and shoots and in KN3119 are induced at low ammonium concentrations. Expressions of AMT3 family genes were higher shoots than in the roots indicating that these genes are probably involved in the translocation and distribution of ammonium ions in leaves. The expression of the only high affinity AMT gene, AMT1;1, along with six low affinity AMT genes in the shoots suggests that low affinity AMTs in the shoots leaves are involved in supporting AMT1;1 to carry out its activities/function efficiently.

publication date

  • 2012
  • 2012
  • 2012