Effects of Soil Flooding on the Survival of Two Potato Pathogens, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Verticillium dahliae uri icon

abstract

  • Results of studies on survival of sclerotia of Sclerotinia and microsclerotia of Verticillium, demonstrated that soil flooding in western Washington is a possible alternative field rotation practice for S. sclerotiorum (white mold), but not for V. dahliae (Verticillium wilt). Cone-tainer experiments in the greenhouse showed that flooding at 16.5 A degrees C caused S. sclerotiorium sclerotia to lose viability between 12 and 24 weeks while a growth chamber experiment revealed that flooding for 18 weeks at 11 A degrees C or 20 A degrees C was sufficient. V. dahliae microsclerotia appeared resistant to flooding under greenhouse and field settings; recovery ranged within 5 to 10 % of the initial soil population after 6 and 12 months. Potatoes planted into field microplots either flooded or fallowed the previous summer had similar Verticillium wilt ratings and potato yield. Lack of control of V. dahliae by flooding may be due partly to relatively low soil temperatures in a cool, marine climate.

publication date

  • 2013
  • 2013
  • 2013