Comparison of Content and In vitro Bioaccessibility of Provitamin A Carotenoids in Home Cooked and Commercially Processed Orange Fleshed Sweet Potato (Ipomea batatas Lam) uri icon

abstract

  • Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) remains a public health problem in some regions of Brazil. Increased use of orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP) as a source of pro-vitamin A represents a potential strategy for prevention of VAD. We compared the pro-vitamin A content, vitamin A equivalency and bioaccessibility of beta-carotene (beta C) of two varieties of home cooked OFSP and two commercial sources of processed OFSP. Pro-vitamin A carotenoid content in home cooked, Beauregard variety of OFSP exceeded that in Amelia variety and commercial products for babies. All-trans-beta C was the most abundant carotenoid in raw, cooked and commercial OFSP. Boiling and frying OFSP generally decreased total beta C. A serving of 100 g FW Beauregard variety of cooked OFSP contained greater than 100 % of the estimated average requirement (EAR) for children and women, and up to 92 % EAR for lactating women. Although the efficiency of micellarization of all-trans-beta C during simulated digestion of OFSP was relatively low (4-8 %) and significantly less than for cis-isomers, the quantities of trans-beta C incorporated into micelles from boiled Beauregard and fried Amelia varieties exceeded that in micelles generated by digesting commercial OFSP. The bioaccessibility of pro-vitamin A carotenoids in the micelle fraction of digested OFSP was confirmed with differentiated cultures of Caco-2 human intestinal cells. Continued development of OFSP such as the Amelia and Beauregard varieties that are rich in trans-beta C and dissemination of best practices for home cooking are encouraged to increase consumption of this food to decrease the risk of vitamin A deficiency in Brazil.

publication date

  • 2015
  • 2015