Mineral element concentrations in grains of Chinese wheat cultivars uri icon

abstract

  • Investigations on concentration of mineral elements including Fe and Zn in wheat grains are important for human health. Two hundreds and sixty-five cultivars and advanced lines were collected and sown at Anyang experimental station of the Institute of Crop Science of the Chinese Academy of Agriculture Sciences in season 2005-2006 to evaluate the genetic variation of major mineral element concentrations in wheat grain. Twenty-four selected cultivars were also planted at seven representative locations in seasons 2005-2006 and 2006-2007 to evaluate the effects of genotype, environment, and genotype by environment interaction on mineral element concentrations. The 265 genotypes displayed a large variation for all mineral elements investigated including Fe and Zn, ranging from 28.0 to 65.4 mg kg(-1) and 21.4 to 58.2 mg kg(-1) for Fe and Zn, with mean values of 39.2 and 32.3 mg kg(-1), respectively. Jimai 26, Henong 326, and Jingdong 8 displayed high Fe and Zn concentrations, and Jimai 26 and Henong 326 also displayed high concentrations of Cu, Mg, K, P, and protein content. Jingdong 8 is the most promising leading cultivar for increasing Fe and Zn concentrations. All mineral element concentrations including Fe and Zn were largely influenced by environment effects. Production of high Fe concentration can be best secured at Jiaozuo and Jinan, and high Zn concentration can be best secured at Jinan and Xuzhou, since samples from these locations in the two seasons are characterized by high Fe or Zn concentration, compared with the other locations. High and significant genotype by environment interaction effects on all mineral element concentrations were also observed, with ratios of genotype by environment to genotype variances all larger than 1.20. Grain Fe concentration was highly significant and positively correlated with that of Zn, indicating a high possibility to combine high Fe and Zn traits in wheat breeding. It also indicated strong positive correlations between concentrations of Fe, Zn, and protein content.
  • Investigations on concentration of mineral elements including Fe and Zn in wheat grains are important for human health. Two hundreds and sixtyfive cultivars and advanced lines were collected and sown at Anyang experimental station of the Institute of Crop Science of the Chinese Academy of Agriculture Sciences in season 2005?2006 to evaluate the genetic variation of major mineral element concentrations in wheat grain. Twenty-four selected cultivars were also planted at seven representative locations in seasons 2005?2006 and 2006?2007 to evaluate the effects of genotype, environment, and genotype by environment interaction on mineral element concentrations. The 265 genotypes displayed a large variation for all mineral elements investigated including Fe and Zn, ranging from 28.0 to 65.4 mg kg-1 and 21.4 to 58.2 mg kg-1 for Fe and Zn, with mean values of 39.2 and 32.3 mg kg-1, respectively. Jimai 26, Henong 326, and Jingdong 8 displayed high Fe and Zn concentrations, and Jimai 26 and Henong 326 also displayed high concentrations of Cu, Mg, K, P, and protein content. Jingdong 8 is the most promising leading cultivar for increasing Fe and Zn concentrations. All mineral element concentrations including Fe and Zn were largely influenced by environment effects. Production of high Fe concentration can be best secured at Jiaozuo and Jinan, and high Zn concentration can be best secured at Jinan and Xuzhou, since samples from these locations in the two seasons are characterized by high Fe or Zn concentration, compared with the other locations. High and significant genotype by environment interaction effects on all mineral element concentrations were also observed, with ratios of genotype by environment to genotype variances all larger than 1.20. Grain Fe concentration was highly significant and positively correlated with that of Zn, indicating a high possibility to combine high Fe and Zn traits in wheat breeding. It also indicated strong positive correlations between concentrations of Fe, Zn, and protein content

publication date

  • 2010
  • 2010
  • 2010