Allelic relationship between spontaneous and induced mutant genes for stem fasciation in chickpea uri icon

abstract

  • Stem fasciation is a morphological abnormality observed in plants where the stem is widened and leaves and flowers or pods are clustered at the apex. Several spontaneous mutants and one induced mutant for stem fasciation are found in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). This study was aimed at determining allelic relationship between spontaneous and induced mutant genes controlling stem fasciation and effects of stem fasciation on grain yield. Two spontaneous (ICC 2042 and ICC 5645) and one induced (JGM 2) stem fasciation mutants were crossed in all combinations, excluding reciprocals. The F1 and F2 plants from a cross between the two spontaneous mutants had fasciated stem. This indicated the presence of a common gene (designated fas1) for stem fasciation in the two spontaneous mutants. The F1s of the crosses of the induced mutant JGM 2 with both spontaneous mutants had normal plants and segregated in a ratio of 9 normal:7 fasciated plants in F2. Thus, the gene for stem fasciation in the induced mutant JGM 2 (designated fas2) is not allelic to the common gene for stem fasciation in spontaneous mutants. The two genes in dominant condition produced normal non-fasciated stem. The fasciated and the non-fasciated F2 plants did not differ significantly for number of pods per plant, number of seeds per plant, grain yield per plant and seed size, suggesting that it is possible to exploit the fasciated trait in chickpea breeding without compromising on yield

publication date

  • 2008
  • 2008