Impact of integrated pest management on food and horticultural crops in Africa uri icon

abstract

  • In sustainable agricultural development, integrated pest management (IPM) can play a key role in the reduction of crop losses, thereby increasing productivity while minimizing environmental contamination and health hazards. In recent years, agricultural research and development partners have pioneered outstanding contributions in IPM, notably in varietal resistance against pests, biological control of alien invasive species, substitution of inorganic pesticides with biopesticides, new export market opportunities, and new tools in biotechnology. Success stories are not limited to these areas, but are also found in the areas of human capital development, information management, and participatory approaches. The potential of IPM to contribute to poverty alleviation and food security is, however, poorly realized in Africa due to a myriad of factors, including inadequate deployment of high-yielding crop varieties, harmful pesticide regimes, political instability, conflicts in social values and civil wars, inappropriate agricultural policies, biased global trade policies, lack of market information, and poor rural infrastructures. Few African countries have adopted IPM as the official national crop protection policy and there is no framework for resource allocation to support widespread promotion of research and training in IPM. This calls for reshaping and revisiting a number of policies related to food production and agricultural development, in order to encourage partnership and participation in the identification, analysis, advocacy, and follow-up of agricultural policy issues as well as public awareness of the effect of pests and diseases on food security and the environment.

publication date

  • 2008
  • 2008