Rational Use of Fungicide Applications to Maximize Peanut Yield Under Foliar Disease Pressure in West Africa uri icon

abstract

  • Foliar diseases caused by Cercospora arachidicola, Cercosporium personatum, and Puccinia arachidis are major constraints to peanut production in the world. Fungicides are among the most efficient available control methods. Field trials were conducted in 1991 and 1992 in Benin and Niger, West Africa, to evaluate the cost effectiveness of fungicide application timings and frequencies on four peanut cultivars. A combination of four timings (40, 55, 70, and 85 days after sowing) was scheduled. Early (causal organism, C. arachidicola) and late (caused by C. personatum) leaf spot were prevalent in both years, but late leaf spot was the more economically important disease as shown by high values of area under the disease progress curve. Application of fungicide reduced late leaf spot incidence and increased pod yield. Pod yield responded to an interaction of number and timing of fungicide applications. With appropriate timing two or three fungicide applications were enough to significantly increase pod yield. Properly timed fungicide sprays can result in substantial monetary gains for peanut farmers in West Africa

publication date

  • 2000
  • 2000