Target region amplification polymorphism (TRAP) for assessing genetic diversity and marker-trait associations in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) germplasm uri icon

abstract

  • The effective utilization of crop diversity held in genebanks depends on our knowledge of useful traits and available markers associated with the target traits. Target region amplification polymorphism (TRAP) was used to evaluate the genetic diversity and underlying relationships among 263 accessions of chickpea landraces maintained by the USDA-ARS Western Regional Plant Introduction Station in Pullman, WA, USA. Two-hundred sixty-two TRAP markers were amplified by eight primer combinations. Altogether, 110 (42 %) markers were polymorphic, the other 152 (58 %) displayed no variation. These polymorphic markers revealed important differences among the accessions, with an estimated, mean pair-wise genetic distance of 25.82 %, ranging from 2.8 to 50.0 %. Genetic distance analysis divided the accessions into two major groups, with 113 and 150 accessions each, and substantial association between molecular diversity and geographic origin was evident. Bayesian analysis of population structure revealed two groups (K = 2) with evidence for six sub-groups. Additionally, the population structure of a subset of 110 lines was determined (K = 3) for testing marker-trait associations (MTAs). Phenotypic traits included the concentrations of protein and nine mineral elements in the seeds. Two MTAs were significant (p < 0.01) for concentrations of Ca and K, and three MTAs were significant for Cu and Ni concentrations. The results indicate that this population is useful for genome-wide association studies on other economic traits given the level of genetic diversity uncovered and the marker-trait associations in seed minerals discovered.

publication date

  • 2014
  • 2014