Farmers' knowledge, attitudes, and practices for rodent management in Myanmar uri icon

abstract

  • A survey of 350 farmers was conducted in the lowland rainfed agricultural system of central Myanmar ( Burma) to examine the importance of rodents, farmers' perception of the causes of yield loss, and their beliefs as to why they undertake rodent management. Farmers grew monsoon rice, summer rice and mungbeans with the major constraints upon production identified as pests (29.4% of respondents), followed by insufficient water (19.4%). The main pests were insects (48.6%), followed by rats (40.9%); however, farmers thought that rats caused most damage to their crops (47.7% of respondents; insects 30.3%), and were the most important pest to control. Farmers estimated that rodents caused 13% yield loss. Most farmers believed they could increase yields if they were to work together to control rats, but 61.1% applied rodent control individually. Most farmers (81%) thought that rodenticides were not safe despite 33% using them. Rodents were clearly identified as a significant problem by farmers. With an understanding of the main rodent pest species, ecology and crop damage, ecologically based management strategies for the lowland rainfed rice system in Myanmar can be developed.

publication date

  • 2008
  • 2008
  • 2008