Long-term fate and transformations of vanadium in a pine forest soil with added converter lime uri icon

abstract

  • A field-trial with different application rates of converter lime (0.2, 0.7 and 1.0 kg m(-2)) was set up in a pine forest stand in southern Sweden in 1984. The lime contained 14.6 g kg(-1) vanadium. The aim with this study was to evaluate the vanadium concentration and speciation in the soil 26 years after application. Samples of the organic mar layer and the mineral soil were analyzed separately. The vanadium concentration decreased with soil depth, from 680 to 8 mg kg(-1) soil. Analysis by vanadium K-edge}CANES spectroscopy showed that vanadium(IV) was the predominant species in the mar layer. Further, iron and/or aluminum (hydr)oxides were important sorbents for vanadium(V) in the mineral soil. The spedation of dissolved vanadium, as determined by HPLC-ICP-MS, was dominated by vanadium(V), which is considered the most toxic vanadium species. However, the vanadium sorption capacity of the soil was sufficient to reduce the total bioavailable vanadium below phytotoxic levels. By combining two different vanadium spedation methods, this study was able to conclude that vanadium speciation in soils is governed by soil properties such as pH, organic matter content and the content of metal (hydr)oxides, but not by the vanadium species added to the soil. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

publication date

  • 2015
  • 2015