Development and use of molecular markers for crop improvement uri icon

abstract

  • At the current rate of population growth, the global populationis expected to touch at least 9 billion in 2050 (Godfray et al.2010), putting an excessive pressure on the food, feed and fuelsupply. To meet this challenge, food supply will need to growannually by 2?3% (Hawkesford et al. 2013). In the past, globalfood production has largely been driven by the development ofdwarf varieties that are responsive to high inputs (both waterand fertilizers), which had negative impact on the environmentleading to decline in crop yields and widening the gap betweenpotential and realized yields. This has been further exacerbatedby the yield losses of up to 40% due to the diseases and pests(Oerke 2006). Abiotic stresses such as drought (due to uncertainand irregular rains), heat (due to rise in temperature), salinity,mineral toxicities and nutrient deficiencies contribute to eitherdecline in productivity or complete failure of crops

publication date

  • 2013
  • 2013