Oxygen use from solution by wheat genotypes differing in tolerance to waterlogging uri icon

abstract

  • Inadequate availability of oxygen to the roots is a major growth-limiting factor for plants exposed to waterlogging stress. Spring breadwheat genotypes ( Triticum aestivum L.) have been found to differ in their tolerance to waterlogging. Three spring wheat genotypes tolerant to waterlogging ( Ducula, Prl/Sara, and Vee/Myna) and two sensitive spring wheat genotypes ( Seri-82, and Kite/Glen) were evaluated for differences in root anatomy and O-2 depletion rates from nutrient solution in growth chamber experiments conducted under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions. Plants in the aerobic treatment were grown for four to five weeks under continuous aerobic conditions. Plants in the hypoxic treatment were initially grown aerobically for two to three weeks followed by two to three weeks of hypoxic conditions. The percent root porosity ranged from 12 to 20% (v/v) for tolerant genotypes and from 6 to 8% for sensitive genotypes grown under hypoxic conditions. Decreasing O-2 supply increased the rate of O-2 uptake in waterlogging tolerant cultivars. Anatomical differences in root structure between tolerant and sensitive genotypes could not be related to observed differences in O-2 use. Although inconclusive, the results suggest that in addition to oxygen transport, the movement of photosynthate to the roots under waterlogged conditions may also be important in conferring tolerance.

publication date

  • 2003
  • 2003
  • 2003