Fingerprinting and genetic variability in cork oak (Quercus suber L.) elite trees using ISSR and SSR markers uri icon

abstract

  • Quercus suber L., is a socially, economically and ecologically important forest species in rural areas of the Mediterranean basin. Fifty three elite-trees from nine stands of four provenance regions in the Community of Extremadura (Spain) were analysed with the aim to establish their DNA-fingerprinting and the genetic relationships among them. Two types of molecular markers, microsatellites and intermicrosatellites, were used for tree genotyping. Microsatellite markers could distinguish 94% of the trees. Observed and expected heterozygosities, and effective number of alleles were correlated with the polymorphism information content (PIC). Intermicrosatellite patterns were used to construct a dendrogram. They showed high levels of genetic diversity in these elite trees, without any clear relationship with provenance regions. Both types of markers detected a high level of intra-stand variability, which is common in Quercus species, probably due to its mating system, the low distance among stands and the small size of stands. Others factors that could affect this result, such as introgression between Q. suber L. and Q. ilex L., are also commented. The high level of genetic variability detected in these elite trees can be useful for improvement programs. Also the usefulness of SSR and ISSR markers to establish the DNA-fingerprinting of each tree could be focused to select clonal lines of commercial interest.

publication date

  • 2007
  • 2007