Determinants of farmers' adoption and adaptation of alley farming technology in Nigeria uri icon

abstract

  • Understanding the factors affecting framers' adoption of improved technologies is critical to success of implementing agroforestry development programs. This paper evaluated the determinants of farmers' decisions to adopt and adapt alley farming technology and its variants in the farming systems of Nigeria, using econometric Logit models. Eleven variables were significant in explaining farmers' adoption decisions. The model results show that farmer characteristics that influenced adoption included the gender of the farmer, contact with extension agents, years of experience with agroforestry and tenancy status in the village. Economic factors, proxied by village-level characteristics that condition resource use incentives, were also significant. These variables include the extent of village land pressure, extent of erosion intensity, village fuel wood pressure, importance of livestock as an economic activity in the village and the distance of the village locations from urban centers. The paper showed that farmers are already making significant modifications to the conventional alley farming technology introduced by scientists. The two most important modifications were the introduction of fallow periods into the conventional system and changes in the pruning regime of the system. Model results showed that human capital variables were significant in explaining farmers' decisions to adapt and modify the technology. Farmer education and family size significantly influence the choice of pruning regime. Farmers' age, education, intensity of erosion in the farmers' village, and farmers' land availability significantly influence whether or not fallow period is introduced into the conventional system. To promote greater adoption of agroforestry alternatives to slash-and-burn agriculture, particular attention should be placed on the use of appropriate socioeconomic characterization, to better target technologies to areas with higher adoption potential.

publication date

  • 2002
  • 2002