The impact of tick control on the productivity of indigenous cattle under ranch conditions in Uganda. uri icon

abstract

  • The impact of tick control on the productivity of indigenous cattle was investigated in three herds of East African shorthorn Zebu and Zebu x Ankole (Nganda) breeds, maintained under three tick management systems practised under ranch conditions: twice-a-week dipping, once-a-month dipping, and no tick control. The milk production and the growth rates of pre-weaned and post-weaned calves were monitored once a month over a period of 34 months. Milk offtake was 23% higher during the heavy rainy seasons than in the long dry seasons. Twice-a-week dipping increased the milk offtake by 21% in the second year of study and prolonged the duration of lactation in cows. Similarly, twice-a-week dipping increased the pre-weaning growth rate by 39% in the second year of study, but had no significant effect on the post-weaning growth rate. Generally, the growth rate of calves were greatest during the heavy rainy seasons and least during the long dry seasons. These results provide a basis for assessing the losses under different tick management systems in the various production systems.
  • The impact of tick control on the productivity of indigenous cattle was investigated in three herds of East African shorthorn Zebu and ZebuĂ—Ankole (Nganda) breeds, maintained under three tick management systems practised under ranch conditions: twice-a-week dipping, once-a-month dipping, and no tick control. The milk production and the growth rates of pre-weaned and post-weaned calves were monitored once a month over a period of 34 months. Milk offtake was 23% higher during the heavy rainy seasons than in the long dry seasons. Twice-a-week dipping increased the milk offtake by 21% in the second year of study and prolonged the duration of lactation in cows. Similarly, twice-a-week dipping increased the pre-weaning growth rate by 39% in the second year of study, but had no significant effect on the post-weaning growth rate. Generally, the growth rate of calves were greatest during the heavy rainy seasons and least during the long dry seasons. These results provide a basis for assessing the losses under different tick management systems in the various production systems

publication date

  • 2003
  • 2003
  • 2003